What is a Hip Labral Tear and how is it treated

With news of Kansas City Royals Outfielder, Alex Gordon going on the disabled list with a labral tear in his left hip we wanted to take a look at what exactly is a labral tear and what are some of the symptoms and causes for this injury.

What is it?

  • A hip labral tear involves the ring of cartilage (labrum) that follows the outside rim of the socket of your hip joint. In addition to cushioning the hip joint, the labrum acts like a rubber seal or gasket to help hold the ball at the top of your thighbone securely within your hip socket.

What are the symptoms?

Many hip labral tears cause no signs or symptoms. Occasionally, however, you may experience one or more of the following:

  • A locking, clicking or catching sensation in your hip joint
  • Pain in your hip or groin
  • Stiffness or limited range of motion in your hip joint

How can you prevent this injury?

  • Hip labral tears are often associated with sports participation. If your sport puts a lot of strain on your hips, condition the surrounding muscles with strength and flexibility exercises. Try to avoid loading your hip with your full body weight when your legs are in positions at the extreme ends of your hip’s normal range of motion.

How can physical therapy help with this injury?

  • A physical therapist can teach you exercises to maximize hip range of motion and hip strength and stability. Therapists can also analyze the movements you perform that put stress on your hip joint and help you avoid these forces.

Don’t forget that our Ortho Urgent Care Clinic is open evenings and on weekends.  Call 913-319-7633 for additional information on the Ortho Urgent Care Clinic.

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